When Common Faith Divides

The Paradox of Orthodoxy in Ukraine and Russia

Authors

  • Zacarias Negron

Abstract

Amidst growing political division and strife, the Russian and Ukrainian peoples are united by a common faith—Orthodoxy. While much literature and punditry offer commentary on the widening chasm between the region’s two predominant iterations of Orthodoxy—Russian and Ukrainian—this author provides a synthesis of religious and sociopolitical history to illuminate the sects’ common beginnings and constitutions. As a result, the author finds that it is not Orthodoxy itself that has fractured the two peoples. Rather, it is strategic usury and politicization that have corrupted Orthodoxy in the post-Soviet space. In response, the author suggests a return to the simplicity of orthodox Orthodoxy, the augmentation of believers’ perceptions of one another, and perhaps a bit of ‘holy foolishness.’

For additional context, listen to the author's reflection on the piece below.

 

Author Biography

Zacarias Negron

Zacarias Negron is a Chancellor’s Scholar at Vanderbilt University, where he is majoring in Political Science (International Track) and Law, History, & Society. He is minoring in Russian Studies and Islamic Studies with a particular focus on the Caucasus and Central Asian regions. He is a member of the Vanderbilt University Debate Team, competing in collegiate and British Parliamentary and Case Competition debates, both foreign and domestic.

Author's Reflection

Published

2022-03-25

How to Cite

Negron, Z. (2022). When Common Faith Divides: The Paradox of Orthodoxy in Ukraine and Russia. SCAFFOLD: A SHOWCASE OF VANDERBILT FIRST-YEAR WRITING, 4. Retrieved from https://ejournals.library.vanderbilt.edu/index.php/UWS/article/view/5307

Issue

Section

Essays on Russian and Eastern European Studies