Bioarchaeological Insights on Dental Health and Diet After the Fall of the Wari Empire in the Peruvian Andes

  • Alysha L Tribbett Student
  • Tiffiny Tung Vanderbilt University Professor

Abstract

This research project looked at the dental health of Late Intermediate Period skeletons from the Wari capital to assess their consumption patterns. A high rate of dental disease coupled with carious lesions indicative of coca chewing supports the hypothesis that post-Wari populations maintained many of the agricultural practices and trade networks of the former state, including consumption of large quantities of maize and frequent coca chewing.

Author Biographies

Alysha L Tribbett, Student
Alysha Tribbett is a senior in the College of Arts and Science, double majoring in anthropology and political science. After graduation in May 2010, she hopes to continue to graduate school to earn a PhD in archaeology. Her research interests include the Jumon period of Japan, dental archaeology, and agriculture.
Tiffiny Tung, Vanderbilt University Professor
Tiffiny Tung is an anthropological bioarchaeologist who analyzes mummies and skeletons from archaeological contexts in the Peruvian Andes. Her research interests include paleopathology, violence-related trauma, the use of the body and body parts in rituals, and bioarchaeological perspectives on embodiment.
Published
05-20-2010
How to Cite
TRIBBETT, Alysha L; TUNG, Tiffiny. Bioarchaeological Insights on Dental Health and Diet After the Fall of the Wari Empire in the Peruvian Andes. Vanderbilt Undergraduate Research Journal, [S.l.], v. 6, may 2010. ISSN 1555-788X. Available at: <http://ejournals.library.vanderbilt.edu/index.php/vurj/article/view/2897>. Date accessed: 18 nov. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.15695/vurj.v6i0.2897.
Section
Humanities and Social Sciences

Keywords

Wari; State Collapse; Huari; dental disease; coca chewing; Andes