The Effects of Social Deprivation within Orphanages on Parent- Child Attachment: How Adoption can Ameliorate Attachment Problems

  • Ariel Hilary Clemons Freshmen

Abstract

Since the mid-20th century, developmentalists have researched how social deprivation within orphanages affects a child’s ability to later form an attachment to his primary caregiver. John Bowlby’s theory of attachment posits that children who do not develop any attachment style within the first two years of their life will subsequently never be to able to become attached to their primary caregivers. However, longitudinal studies conducted on children reared in orphanages have proved that there is no critical period within which attachment must be formed. A child’s ability to form an attachment to his adoptive parent is not based on his age, but rather on the parent’s commitment to promoting a secure attachment style through affectionate and responsive care.

Author Biography

Ariel Hilary Clemons, Freshmen
Ariel Clemons is a freshman undergraduate student in the Peabody College majoring in Human and Organizational Development. Ariel is a native of Potomac, Maryland, and a member of Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Society. In addition, Ariel's paper "Female Submissiveness: The Inability to Escape Male Authority in Rebel Without a Cause and 'Daddy'" was selected for presentation during the Spring 2009 Vanderbilt Undergraduate Writing Symposium. Ariel hopes to continue developing her writing skills and style during the remainder of her undergraduate experience at Vanderbilt.
Published
07-25-2009
How to Cite
CLEMONS, Ariel Hilary. The Effects of Social Deprivation within Orphanages on Parent- Child Attachment: How Adoption can Ameliorate Attachment Problems. Vanderbilt Undergraduate Research Journal, [S.l.], v. 5, july 2009. ISSN 1555-788X. Available at: <http://ejournals.library.vanderbilt.edu/index.php/vurj/article/view/2808>. Date accessed: 18 nov. 2017. doi: https://doi.org/10.15695/vurj.v5i0.2808.
Section
Humanities and Social Sciences

Keywords

Child Development